The Herb society of America

Frankenmuth mid-Michigan unit

 

 

Established 1983

The Herb Society of America is dedicated to promoting the knowledge, use and delight of herbs through educational programs, research, and sharing the experience of its members with the community. 

This is also the mission of the

 

Frankenmuth Mid-Michigan Unit of HSA

 

We meet at the Frankenmuth Historical Museum, Fischer Hall.

613 S. Main Street,  Frankenmuth, Michigan

1.989.652.9701

 

Meetings…

 

You are welcome to come to a meeting

 to see what we are all about. 

We meet the second Monday of every  month …

 7 pm at the

Frankenmuth Historical

Museum in Frankenmuth,  MI.

 

December our Annual Christmas Party

date and time announced at a later date….

 

January is our Board Meeting time and date announced at a later day….

 

We have a program at each meeting.  Topics related to the study of herbs/gardens; from history, to propagation, to uses, and beyond. 

 

If you plan on attending

please contact:

Pat Stoppelworth

frankenmuthherbsociety@gmail.com

Botany & Horticulture ……….  Mary Nuechterlein

Garden ……………………….. Debbie Sparchu

Library ……………….………  Mary Nuechterlein

Newsletter ………………….… Marianne Dafoe

Publicity ……………………...  Joy Gajewski

Membership ………….............  Pat Wearmouth

Ways & Means ………………. Gloria Rodammer

                                                    Audrey Palmreuter

Education …………………….. Pat Stoppelworth

Chairwoman……………………Joy Gajewski

Vice Chairwoman………………Debbie Sparschu

Treasurer………………………..Liz Stearns

Recording Secretary…………….Cyndy Bellaver

Corresponding Secretary………..Gloria Rodammer

Historian………………………...Heidi Enge

Past Chairwoman…………….....Marianne Dafoe

Executive Board

Standing Committees

 

Our members are available

for speaking engagements.

Contact person: 

Pat Stoppelworth

frankenmuthherbsociety@gmail.com

Monthly Meetings

 

2018

 

August 13-Membership Tea

September 10

October 8

November 12

December 10-Membership Party

 

Frankenmuth-Mid

Michigan Unit

 

Unit’s Website

www.frankenmuthherbsociety.org

 

Unit’s Email

frankenmuthherbsociety@gmail.com

Frankenmuth Historical Museum

Frankenmuth Mid-Michigan Herb Garden

613 S. Main Street

Frankenmuth, Michigan

THE HERB SOCIETY OF AMERICA

FRANKENMUTH MID-MICHIGAN UNIT

July 2018  — VOLUME XXXVI, ISSUE X

 

August Meeting

 

 

 

OTHER DATES OF INTEREST

August 18…...Frankenmuth Herb Society at the Frankenmuth Farmers Market .. Herbal Vinegar’s

September 21-22….Great Lakes District Gathering, hosted by Western Pennsylvania Unit in Pittsburgh

October 13….Western Reserve Unit Annual Herb Fair

June 14-15….Annual Ed Conference Madison Wisconsin

Humulus

 Lupulus

Hops

2018

Herb

of the

Year

Recipes

 

 

Basil & Nasturtium Summer Salad

1 cup basil leaves

1 cup nasturtium leaves

7 cups baby salad greens

1⁄2 teaspoon kosher salt

4 ripe plums, seeded and quartered

1⁄2 cup toasted pecans

12 nasturtium blossoms

1/3 (+2 tablespoons) cups lemon vinaigrette

Place basil, nasturtium leaves, and salad greens in a large bowl. Sprinkle salt over salad mix. Pour 1/3

cup vinaigrette over salad, gently tossing.

Divide salad between 4 salad plates, top with plum quarters and pecans. Drizzle remaining vinaigrette

over salads. Top each plate with 3 nasturtium blossoms.

Serves 4

—by cookwithsusan, July 6, 2010, Food52

 

Nasturtium-Chive Vinegar

1 12-16 ounce bottle of unseasoned white rice vinegar or white wine vinegar

6-8 nasturtium leaves, plus 3 or 4 nasturtium blooms

1 small handful of fresh chives or garlic chives (including blooms, if desired), optional

Cut fresh, organic nasturtium leaves, and blooms and some chives or garlic chives. Discard any brown,

yellowed or bruised leaves. Wash gently but thoroughly under cool water. Pat dry with paper towels. Push

the sprigs down into a nearly full bottle of vinegar (a fondue fork is great for this but a long skewer can be

used). Or, pour vinegar into a larger jar or bottle, add herbs and cap with a cork or nonreactive top. Be

sure the herbs are completely submerged. Let the mixture steep at least a few days so the flavor can

develop before using.

— adapted from Nancy Baggett, kitchenlane.com

Besides making oil and vinegar dressings, add a little splash to enhance a simple butter sauce for

seafood or a pan sauce for sautéed meat. Or use a little to perk up sautéed cabbage and slaw or add life

to store-bought mayo.

 

Cantaloupe Basil Agua Fresca

INGREDIENTS

15 cups chopped cantaloupe (about two 3 1/2-pound melons)

3/4 cup fresh lemon juice

3/4 cup loosely packed fresh basil leaves

RECIPE PREPARATION

• Working in batches, purée cantaloupe in a blender until smooth.

• Set a fine-mesh sieve over a large bowl; line sieve with cheesecloth. Strain purée into bowl; gather

cheesecloth into a bundle and squeeze any remaining juice into bowl. Repeat process with fresh

cheesecloth, straining into a large pitcher (you should have about 5 cups juice).

• Add lemon juice, basil, and 2 cups cold water to pitcher. Let steep at room temperature for 1–2 hours. Fill

glasses with ice. Divide agua fresca among glasses.

 

Cucumber, Mint, And Basil Soda

1 1/2 cups Simple Syrup (click for recipe)

1/2 large cucumber (about 8 oz.), thinly sliced crosswise, plus 12 slices for garnish

24 fresh mint leaves plus 12 sprigs for garnish

12 fresh basil leaves

6 cups soda water, divided

Bring 1 1/2 cups simple syrup to a boil in a small saucepan. Remove pan from heat and add cucumber slices

(reserving 12 for garnish), 24 mint leaves, and basil. Cover and let steep for 30 minutes. Strain cucumber-herb syrup

into a jar, pressing on solids in strainer. Fill a 12-oz. glass with ice cubes. Add 2 Tbsp. syrup and top with soda water

(about 1/2 cup). Stir to combine. Garnish with cucumber slice and sprig of mint. Repeat to make 11 more sodas.

 

 

Did You Know ?

In a recent newspaper article by Dr. Nate Walton an entomologist for the MSU Extension Program in Leelanau

county, there is a specific bee that only pollinates squash blossoms. The squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, is a

specialty pollinator that only visits the flowers of winter squash, zucchinis, pumpkins and their close relatives.

For thousands of years these little bees have been pollinating plants in the squash family. Over time they have

evolved a symbiosis with the squash vine to such an extent that without the squash the bee would cease to exist and

without the bee, the squash would have a very hard time producing seeds or fruit.

Similar in size to the honey bee, Peponapsis pruinosa is a solitary bee, they do not live in social colonies like honey

bees. Each bee digs her own tunnel at least a foot straight down into the soil beneath a squash vine. In her tunnel

she constructs her tiny brood chambers and provisions each with a ball of squash pollen. The young will feed on the

pollen balls and remain underground through the winter before emerging the following summer to pollinate the next

years squash crop. Michigan State University would like your help as they try to learn more about these often

overlooked heroes of the vegetable garden. Specifically they are asking citizen scientists to survey bee activity in this

years squash crop. For more information and to access the survey visit MSU Vegetable Entomology at http://

vegetable.ent.msu.edu/squash-bee-project/

Sounds really interesting and who knew that squash plants had their own bees!

 

Membership Tea

6:00 pm

Lynn Storr’s

Garden

Related imageImage result for nasturtium chive vinegarImage result for squash bees